Reconstruction surgery

Transcript

When I first did reconstruction, I did…Okay! This is a real boob, this one has a fake one and I’m wearing a little paddy here (pointing at her chest). When you get a mastectomy, there’s nothing there. It’s just like a weird warped looking scar. It had a weird little cleave in it and it was just completely flat. And then, they put a tissue expander inside. They put this hard balloon in and every week I go to the surgeon and they go “Whoosh” and it fills up. It’s high, I could touch it with my chin because then when they put the implant in, it’ll come down a bit. That was so painful. I’ll never, I would never get a tissue expander it hurts. Maybe some people are different but I guess the area was just damaged already. It was so screwed up from the radiation and so screwed up from the surgeries that it hurt a lot. Then I finally had the implant put in and because I had a weird warpy scar, which happens sometimes, it wasn’t boob shaped. It was like  (indicating the shape with her hand). So 4 weeks ago he, my surgeon, who’s actually a really good surgeon, it’s really precise, he cut out the scar… looks like an eye like this. And he cut it out and he cut a piece of muscle and skin from my back. He brought it out front and he sewed it up. So there’s no weird scar there anymore. He was concerned about scars, I don’t care about scars, I care about shape but I still have an indent here and he said “I wasn’t ignoring your weird indent, there’s probably…we have to do some fat grafting." You can’t make a breast out of nothing. They can do really amazing things. Part of the reason that breast implants look the way they do is because they’re sitting behind a real breast. There is no breast there, it’s like putting a boob on your back or your knee and trying to make it look like the other one.

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