Interaction with professionals

Transcript

It came to the point where we had this appointment with the doctor and I remember we were in the, like, in an office probably a little bit smaller than this room, with my dad, my mom, myself and the doctor, and they basically gave us the option of amputation. But because of somebody in his condition, it could take years—he estimated maybe like 5 years just to adjust, because of his condition—to adjust to not having a leg with rehab and things like that. And because of his heart condition, he would most likely pass away on the table—because of his heart disease—because of the anesthetic they would have to use. Or go off dialysis and within 4 days he would pass away.

So basically it was a death sentence. There wasn’t really any good news there, but what I loved about this doctor, and this was the only doctor that I remember that didn’t beat around the bush. All the doctors we had sugar-coated everything. It made us feel there was hope, there were other options. But this doctor just said it like it was and I loved that. I was already tired of everything else that was happening in a medical field that—like our doctor saying he had a clean bill of health and then congestive heart failure—so I was already tired of listening to doctors, but to have this guy not only give it like it was, but then he asked, he went and asked us personally “How are you doing?” He just made you feel like you were included in this, like […] not only was this a major affliction for dad, but this was also afflicting us. So I really felt that he made us feel special in that sense, that he was looking after us.

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