Effects of care recipients' behaviour

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Well first to the ill person, okay, I believe in giving if they can. I’m not talking about dementia, but if the person is cognitively okay, realize what’s going on around you. Realize that there’s a need there as well. I remember I once had the flu and my husband said—and we had a good relationship—and he said “Don’t worry, I’ll manage dinner on my own.” And I wanted to say “Thanks. I’d like a little soup.” Some “I’m here! Hello!” But that’s what happens. So first and foremost, the spouse needs to take responsibility for the caregiver. It could be as simple as making sure there are flowers delivered once in a while if you’re able to make a phone call. That would make a tremendous difference. Saying “thank you”, saying “I’m sorry”, not even for things. […] You don’t have to be sorry for the illness but you could be sorry for what your spouse is going through. Just, there’s so many things that a well spouse goes through that a spouse can just appreciate, to recognize and just appreciate.

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