Impact on professional life and career 2

Transcript

He ended up going for 6 weeks of radiation treatments—every day we went down. I had to take time off work because I basically had a breakdown and I just—I couldn’t function anymore. And I had to… I just, I took this time off and I drove him down every day and he went for the radiation treatments. And we dealt with all that. And the poor guy, he was like so tired, lost half of his hair, and it was just, it was just really, really difficult. But anyway, after that the tumour shrunk a little bit and the last MRI that he had they said that the tumour was… well, they said “stable”. So that was back in December. And after, because he had gone for the radiation and the tumour shrunk a bit, and because he’s taking the drugs on a regular basis—like, not missing any, and they increased the amount of drugs that he’s taking and the combination of drugs—he’s actually, he was seizure-free for more than a year. And so he got his licence back. And so now, he’s able to drive again, which is a huge benefit to him and me because, when he wasn’t driving for over a year, I mean, I was the taxi. I was driving him all over the place and I felt—I mean, I had to do it. It’s my son; I had to do it and I wanted to do it.

But you know what? It’s so difficult to play taxi all the time, especially when you need to get up for work early in the morning and kids like to stay out late—they like to stay out late—and so, I would often have to say, “Well yeah, I can pick you up, but what it can’t… it’s not going be 12 midnight. It’s going to have to be 11, I’m sorry.” And so, I would feel bad cutting back on his social time, but there’s a limit to what you can do as a caregiver. Like, you’re not, you’re not superwoman, you’re not superman and you’re not a magician. And it’s so hard because you get so, so tired; physically tired, emotionally tired, drained. It’s just, it’s brutal.

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