Finding and sharing information

audioclip
Transcript

I went on the Internet and I think it was maybe the worst thing I could have done. There are a lot of scary things out on the Internet and it’s hard to filter all of that, especially because I had sort of the diagnosis and I had the doctors. I had I made sure to get copies of everything, everything so I have a file with the results of everything that I’ve done and everything that the doctors have done but then you have words that you don’t understand or concepts that you don’t understand and you Google them. There’s such a wide range of information out there you don’t really know. You know there’s people that say that chemo is horrible and that nobody should do chemo and that there are other options besides the chemo and there’s a healthy diet you know certain diets, etc. All the way to “You have to have chemo.” I had to stop, I actually had to stop going on the Internet.

There are a lot of women out there with breast cancer and so I had several people who offered their experiences to me and that was very helpful. That actually helped me choose the hospital closest to me because a girlfriend of mine said that she had gone there and she gave me the name of the doctor. So I got her doctor because she raved about him. I also went to a cancer centre and they were very helpful also.

They had a lot of pamphlets, a lot of books; one of them was how to help my children through this which was a big thing for me. I didn’t want them to be too scarred by all of this. In the end I didn’t even… I had… there was a book that I could read to them but the kids are very resilient and very okay. They were okay; my oldest one probably understood more the implications of breast cancer and the fact that in theory I could die. So she was probably the most affected by it. The younger ones just wanted to know about my hair, how come I was going lose my hair and then they said “Okay and can I have lunch now?” And that was really the end of it.

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