Society and caregiving

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Transcript

I know that there are people out there who are the only person doing the caregiving for someone who is seriously chronically ill or dying. But it’s a hell of a lot to handle as well as your own life, and especially, I think, when dementia’s involved. Because you’re constantly having to try and move through the confusion and the contradictions and try and figure out what it is that they really want and whether it’s possible to give it to them. And so, I don’t know. I mean, I don’t know how in the culture we can support people—who don’t necessarily know each other, but who are friends of the person that needs the caregiving—to come together and work as a group. And perhaps, that would be facilitated through these specific roles of power of attorney and representative. I mean, those people end up having to work together. But I guess, I would really encourage people to, if at all possible, have that circle of friends from the person who you are caregiving for, because there’s going to be so much that one of them will know that the others won’t know.

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